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Learn More about Loyola’s Medical Amnesty policy here.

Concerned about your drinking? Take an on-line assessment here.Want to talk about the results? Make an appointment to talk to a trained mental health professional at the University Counseling Center by calling 504-865-3835.

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Concerned about your drinking? Take an on-line assessment here. Want to talk about the results? Make an appointment to talk to a trained mental health professional at the University Counseling Center by calling 504-865-3835.

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The key to responsible drinking is planning:

  • How many drinks total can you responsibly consume?
  • What time is your evening(drinking) starting and ending?
  • What is an appropriate amount per hour for you?

Use a blood alcohol calculator to plan your night so that you don’t end up trashed. Concerned about your drinking? Take an on-line assessment here. Want to talk about the results? Make an appointment to talk to a trained mental health professional at the University Counseling Center by calling 504-865-3835.

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Are you feeling depressed or more sad than usual?  Have your friends or family expressed concern about how you are handling things?  We are here to help. Health and Education at Loyola (HEAL) and the University Counseling Center are partnering with the Counseling Graduate Program to put on the annual Loyola Student Depression Screening.  Monday, October 20th, 11:30 am to 2:30 pm, in the Octavia Room (second floor, Dana Center). This is a quick (15 minutes) and confidential one-on-one assessment  to see if you are good to go, or need a little help.  If you need a lot of help, University Counseling Center staff is available immediately to speak privately about your concerns.

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Oct 20-26 is National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week. It’s a time learn more about responsible drinking, reflect on your own alcohol consumption, and get the skills you need to stay safe and healthy while having fun. Concerned about your drinking? Take an on-line assessment here. Want to talk about the results? Make an appointment to talk to a trained mental health professional at the University Counseling Center by calling 504-865-3835.

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1. BREATHE:Take a slow deep breath in through your nose and out through your mouth. Repeat, slowly, five times.

2. LET GO: Is it important? Can you change the outcome? Is worrying about it helping? If the answer is no, let it go.

3. TAKE A BREAK:

Curious? Read more here.

4. LAUGH: If it’s a little embarrassing now, it will probably be a funny story later. Cultivate a sense of humor.

5. SEEK HELP: Feel like it’s too much to handle? Make an appointment at the University Counseling Center: 504.865.3835.

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Freshmen! How are you feeling after your first month at Loyola? Excited? Confused? Overwhelmed? Knowing where you are in the adjustment curve can help. Want to know more? Read on…

The W-Shaped Adjustment Curve
The adjustment curve describes the fluctuations in how an individual feels as he or she adapts to a brand new environment, like college. Although the adjustment process varies by individual, the W Curve can help you anticipate and understand the feelings you’re experiencing as you adjust to college.

The Honeymoon Period

  • You feel both excitement and nervousness about college life.
  • You are filled with enthusiasm for new experiences, like joining clubs and attending classes.

Culture Shock

  • The excitement of novelty wears off as you face the realities and frustrations of college life.
  • You may feel distressed and overwhelmed as you try to adjust to the numerous changes in your life.

Initial Adjustment

  • You grow accustomed to college life and begin to feel a sense of mastery over your environment.
  • You develop social and academic routines and feel more confident in you status as a college student.

Mental Isolation

  • Home is not as familiar as it used to be but college life isn’t as comfortable as home once was.
  • You may experience a sense of isolation and feel that you don’t fully belong in either world.

Acceptance and Integration

  • As you gain history with friends and professors, you begin to feel truly connected to the college community.
  • You begin to integrate the positive experiences with the challenges and may even call college “home.”

Comments? Freshmen, where are you on the Adjustment Curve? Upperclassmen, does any of this sound familiar? Any advice on how to handle the transition?

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It’s typical for new (and returning) students to miss home around the one month mark of resuming classes.  It’s natural to miss family members, friends, and even pets—those who know you well and provide the comforts of your usual routine.

With time, the adjustment to school will feel easier but in the meantime, here are a few tips to help get you through.

Be creative about making new friends
Talk to people in your classes, in the dining hall, when waiting in line—remember, you are not the only one looking to connect.

Decorate
Fill your room with pictures of people and places that make you smile.

Get involved
Activities will not only keep you busy but will also introduce you to new people, think about joining clubs, attending a fitness class at the University Sports Complex or volunteering.

Follow your interests
Other students who like music, rugby, or whatever you’re into will help you feel like there is a niche for you.  Accept invitations or ask others to join you.

Appreciate alone time
It can be difficult to find privacy during the semester.  Times to relax or study quietly are healthy.

Reach out for support
Residential life staff, advisors, chaplains, and counselors are all available if you need to talk.

Reminisce
Tell people what it’s like in your hometown and ask about their experiences.  Catch up regularly with loved ones back home and plan some visits.  Remember, your family and friends miss you too!

For more information about Loyola’s University Counseling Center please visit us on the web.

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We have a visitor on campus that comes around every fall and it’s called the Puss Moth Caterpillar. It is considered one of the most toxic caterpillars in North America. These caterpillars are teardrop-shaped with long silky hair. When the hairs are touched, they break off and remain in the skin releasing venom. Intense throbbing pain develops within five minutes and the pain extends up through the affected extremity. On the skin, the appearance of blood colored spots appears at the site of the sting. Other symptoms may include headaches, nausea, vomiting, intense abdominal distress, and swollen lymph nodes.

If you are stung by one of these caterpillars, please seek medical attention immediately. If this incident occurs during Loyola Student Health operating hours Monday-Friday, 8:30a.m. — 4:45 p.m., visit Student Health located in the basement of the Danna Center. If you are stung after clinic hours, the treatment guidelines are as follows:
1. Use adhesive tape to remove spines that remain on the skin
2. Wash the area with soap and water
3. Apply ice pack and baking soda to reduce pain and swelling
4. Take over the counter pain medication such as Advil or Tylenol to reduce pain
5. Take an over the counter antihistamine such as Benadryl or Zyrtec to relieve itching

If the pain becomes too severe or if you are having difficulty breathing please contact LUPD at (504) 865-3434 and request ambulance transport or go to the nearest emergency department. For a list of local emergency departments please visit Loyola’s Student Health Services website at http://studentaffairs.loyno.edu/health.

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