Effective August 1, 2015 Loyola University has become a 100% tobacco-free campus. Through tobacco-related research, public awareness, and policy change, Loyola University has promoted the public health of its community. This change in policy reflects the Loyola community’s change in knowledge about and attitude towards the use of tobacco and tobacco related products. The change in policy outlines that the use of any tobacco product (smoking, chewing, etc.) as well as the use of inhalers, vapors, and e-cigarettes is prohibited on Loyola’s campus.
For a review of the complete policy, please visit: http://finance.loyno.edu/human-resources/tobacco-free-policy
Cessation options:
• 24 Hour Telephone Quit Hotline: 1-800-QUIT-NOW
• quitSTART: This is a free app that takes the information you provide about your smoking history and gives you tailored tips, inspiration, and challenges to help you become smoke-free.
• Freedom From Smoking Online: This American Lung Association program consists of seven modules that you work through at your own pace: www.ffsonline.org
• QuitNet: This program helps you prepare to quit as well as receive online support. You must register and can access most of the information for free: https://quitnet.meyouhealth.com/#/
• Zombie Smokeout Mobile Game: Keep your hands busy until the urge to smoke passes. When a craving for a cigarette hits you, it may seem intense. It usually weakens in a few minutes, but during those few minutes it’s a good idea to find something else to do. Take a walk, go get a drink of water, or play Zombie Smokeout. This action-packed mobile game can distract and entertain you to help get you past your craving.

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Loyola Students are about to embark on a period of final exams and a barrage of due dates that will fill every waking moment and even steal some sleepy ones.  This process will be difficult for the C student, just as it is for the A student.  Working toward long term goals such as earning a high grade in Organic Chemistry or graduating with a degree in Creative Writing are tough.  While we are built for achieving long term goals (see: Pyramids, Great Wall of China, that 10 page research paper that wouldn’t write itself), it takes a certain amount of motivation to get there.

Motivation is tricky.  I do not suggest using the same strategies that the builders of the Pyramids used to earn A’s on your upcoming finals.  I’m a pragmatist at heart, so truthfully, I recommend anything that works – but let me tell you what experience and research say are the most effective.

Behavioral research shows that motivation to start and continue a task is best done through carrots… or reinforcementsReceiving compliments, eating snacks, taking Netflix breaks, scheduling video game time outs, taking naps, going for walks outside, going for  walks inside, skipping ahead to an easier assignment, talking with a friend, going to the gym, deciding to check Facebook or Twitter or Instagram, going for a meal with friends, having a cup of coffee, getting a high five, receiving a high five, going for a drive, going for a streetcar ride… the list goes on… are all better ways to build rewards into your study habits instead of punishing yourself through procrastination, sleep deprivation, locking yourself in a room, failing a test, avoiding telling your parent why you earned a D on that paper, telling your parent that you earned a D on that paper, feeling guilty for taking the undeserved videogame break, missing meals, isolating yourself socially, no one giving you a high five, pounding your 3rd Red Bull of the morning, taking Adderall when it is not prescribed to you or writing run-on sentences.  Why is this?  Because, we are better at avoiding punishments than learning from them.  This will always be true, but it is especially true when we are not aware of the meaning behind why we are at Loyola.

When your internal reason is your center, you can put the extra hours into studying and not feel like you are sacrificing or being punished.  Studying and learning can become reinforcements in and of themselves.  You no longer avoid the anxiety (read procrastination) but face it and make your way through it.  Pretty soon, you’ll be on your way to earning that A in Organic Chemistry and designing plans for your next Pyramid.

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On August 1, 2015 Loyola University New Orleans will become a tobacco-free campus. This historic change on our campus is not only happening here, but also in our city with the SmokeFreeNOLA movement. This change will improve the health of everyone on campus including our visitors.

The health benefits of a tobacco-free campus are not only beneficial to the tobacco user, but also for every person on campus who may be exposed to second and thirdhand smoke. According to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), secondhand smoke causes many negative effects including different types of cardiovascular diseases, lung cancer, and numerous health problems. Many of these can lead to an early death. According to the CDC, since the 1964 Surgeon General’s Report, 2.5 million adults who were non-smokers died because they breathed secondhand smoke.

A big misconception is that just a brief occasional public encounter with cigarette smoke will not cause negative health effects. According to the CDC, there is no risk-free level of exposure to secondhand smoke. This means that there is no safe level of exposure to secondhand smoke. Besides secondhand smoke, there is another hidden danger of cigarette smoke called thirdhand smoke. This is the toxic residue that lingers on many surfaces long after a cigarette is extinguished. This residue (thirdhand smoke) is a health risk to those who come in contact with it. It can be found on clothing, hair, skin, furniture, carpet, vehicles and many other surfaces. The chemicals in thirdhand smoke are carcinogenic (cancer-causing) and can be released back into the air we breathe.

A tobacco-free community will promote a healthy campus environment by decreasing community exposure to second and thirdhand smoke, assist those who wish to stop smoking through cessation programs and prevent student smokers from developing a lifelong smoking habit. Negative health effects of smoking and secondhand smoke include: numerous respiratory illnesses, asthma exacerbation, allergic reactions, persistent cough, allergy-related illnesses, diminished vocal ability, decreased lung capacity, and cosmetic changes (increased wrinkles, yellowing of teeth and nails).

This is an exciting time for the entire Loyola community as we work toward improved health and well-being!

 

 

 

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This free training prepares volunteers to be first responders to survivors of sexual violence. The itinerary includes presentations from various campus and community experts on the following: contextualization of sexual violence, medical and legal resources, Loyola’s resources and requirements, and empathic listening skill development. Our spring training will be held THIS SATURDAY, April 18, 2015 from 8:45a.m. to 4p.m. in the Octavia Room (2nd floor Danna Center). Please RSVP to Alison Cofrancesco by Wednesday, April 15th at aacofran@loyno.edu or via phone at 504-865-3835.

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Concerned about your substance use? Take an on-line assessment here. Want to talk about the results? Make an appointment to talk to a trained mental health professional at the University Counseling Center by calling 504-865-3835.

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Concerned about your substance use? Take an on-line assessment here. Want to talk about the results? Make an appointment to talk to a trained mental health professional at the University Counseling Center by calling 504-865-3835.

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Concerned about your substance use? Take an on-line assessment here. Want to talk about the results? Make an appointment to talk to a trained mental health professional at the University Counseling Center by calling 504-865-3835.

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Concerned about your substance use? Take an on-line assessment at http://counsellingresource.com/lib/quizzes/drug-testing/drug-abuse. Want to talk about the results? Make an appointment to talk to a trained mental health professional at the University Counseling Center by calling 504-865-3835.

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It’s getting to be that time again; the end of the semester is near and the stress of getting everything done is starting to pile up. How can you begin to actively work towards effectively and appropriately alleviating some of that stress? Experiment with these and see what happens.

  • Be Thankful

“Make a gratitude list” and say “thank you.” When under stress, sit down and make a list of all the things and people you are grateful for. If possible, call or write those you are grateful to and let them know of your gratitude. Don’t forget to listen to their response.

  • Eat Healthy

Eating properly can help reduce stress. It might be cliché to say but we really are what we eat. Therefore, if we take in more junk and fast-food then we are more likely to feel like junk, sluggish, unmotivated, etc. On the other hand, if we take in more healthy food then we are more likely to feel healthier, motivated, proactive, etc.

  • Enjoy the Weather and Be Active

It’s spring time! Enjoy the weather by basking in the sun and soaking up some vitamin D. Be active! Instead of using your energy to stress, choose to use it productively.

  • Find Peace

Meditate. Meditation can be anything that helps you to make genuine contact with the present (reading, exercising, listening to music, dancing, etc.). Use breathing, relaxation and mindfulness skills. Take a walk either solo, with friends, or with pets.

  • Think Positively

Smile. Be able to laugh at yourself. Practice positive self-talk and keep a positive frame of mind. “Always look on the bright side of your life.”

  • Have a Plan

Make a daily realistic schedule and stick with it. Prepare and rehearse a positive way to respond to a particular stressor. Get a healthy amount of quality sleep – neither too much nor too little.

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Concerned about your substance use? Take an on-line assessment at http://counsellingresource.com/lib/quizzes/drug-testing/drug-abuse. Want to talk about the results? Make an appointment to talk to a trained mental health professional at the University Counseling Center by calling 504-865-3835.

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