The Miami Law Human Rights Law Clinic seeks applicants for a full-time Lecturer/Practitioner-in Residence & Program Manager to begin in Summer 2018. For more information about the position, visit:—Practitioner-in-Residence-Program-Manager_R100022539

Applicants are strongly encouraged to apply by April 15, 2018.

Please contact with any questions.

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The LSBA Access to Justice Department is accepting applications for the LIFT Incubator Project at the Southwest Louisiana Law Center (Law Center).

Legal Innovators for Tomorrow (LIFT) is a legal incubator program designed to address the legal needs of the underserved and underrepresented by supporting new lawyers build viable and sustainable public interest-focused solo law firms. Through a collaborative project with the Southwest Louisiana Law Center (“Law Center”), LIFT Fellows are working to help address the unmet civil legal needs of low and moderate income families in the Lake Charles area.

The LIFT Incubator Project at the Law Center is for new or transitioning attorneys starting their own solo law practice. During the 18-month program, incubator attorneys receive office space, supplies, and resources. The attorneys also receive training and mentorship as they work alongside experienced Law Center legal practitioners. In exchange for the training and incubation of their practice, attorneys agree to provide pro bono representation in cases referred by the Law Center.

This program is ideal for the entrepreneurial lawyer seeking to establish his or own practice living in the Lake Charles area. Louisiana licensed attorneys with 0-5 years practice experience who plan to develop or have begun to develop a sustainable solo law practice that provides cost-effective legal solutions to low and moderate income families are encouraged to apply.

The program is looking for two attorneys. The application process deadline is April 16, 2018. Click here to download the application. Please send your completed applications in one pdf file to Amy Duncan at

To learn more about the program, go to

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Students Seeking Summer Internships? Apply by March 30: 2018 Paid Legal Internship at If/When/How in Oakland

“If/When/How’s office is such a revitalizing and validating place to be after the first year of law school. I feel like I learned so much more about the missing parts of a legal education — about race, privilege, and about the world of reproductive justice.” – Sarah S., 2017 Summer Legal Intern 

The organization is looking for law students who want to spend 10 paid weeks with If/When/How in our national office in Oakland, CA learning the lay of the land in the reproductive justice movement!

If/When/How’s summer legal internship program provides learning experiences for law students interested in reproductive rights law and justice policy advocacy, legal education, strategic organizing, coalition work, and/or nonprofit management.

To ensure If/When/How is practicing the values inherent in the RJ framework, we are proud to offer two paid summer legal internships. Law students’ financial situations should not determine the work they are able to undertake, particularly if they are passionate about social justice issues and want to utilize their degree to advocate for progressive change.

Download the Summer Legal Intern Application for more information and instructions on how to apply. Deadline to apply is March 30, 2018.

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The New Orleans Independent Police Monitor is seeking qualified applicants for the position of Attorney I (Civil Service Classification: Management Development Specialist II).

SALARY: $46,306.00 /Year

OPENING DATE: 01/16/17

OIPM Application Deadline: March 30, 2018


The ideal candidate for this work must be able to analyze existing law and policy, review the facts provided by NOPD investigators and analyze the quality of their investigations. They must be familiar with employment, criminal and civil rights law and experienced in legal research and writing. The most complex aspects of this work are:

1.    The ability to apply appropriate law or policy to a fact scenario.

2.    The ability to review large amounts of information, organize it, categorize it and combine it to provide a clear fact scenario, timeline, and logically sound conclusions and theories that are presented, in writing, in clear, concise and persuasive language.

3.    The ability to monitor an NOPD investigation in real time: powerful observation skills and an eye for detail; the fortitude to ask key questions; knowledge of and the ability to learn right police practices so that they might identify deviations; willingness to be on call and the physical ability to navigate crime scenes and monitor autopsies.

4.    Strong research skills – OIPM often researches topics that are highly specialized or that have not been the subject of easily found academic or judicial review. The person in this position must be able to tenaciously pursue relevant case law, research studies and best practice policies – often on obscure subjects.

5.    Impartiality: The ideal candidate must be able to conduct impartial analysis and write legal analysis without bias or emotion. An ideal candidate must have strong professional ethics and clarity about state ethics laws.

For more information, please visit


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The Advocacy Center is seeking applicants for the Director of Community Advocacy position.

Learn More: Director of Community Advocacy (002)

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Justice for Trafficking Victims: Criminal
Restitution and Civil Remedies
March 2, 2018
10 AM – 3 PM
Loyola University New Orleans, 6363 Saint Charles Ave, Library Room
New Orleans, Louisiana 70118

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                The Appalachian Research and Defense Fund of Kentucky, Inc. (AppalReD Legal Aid) is seeking law clerks for the summer of 2018 in its Barbourville and Somerset offices to assist attorneys in all phases of client representation and program work.  The clerkships are unpaid so students must provide their own funding. Work study and similar arrangements with a sponsoring institution will be considered.

Our well-established legal services program is in its 47th year of serving low-income and vulnerable clients and client groups in a 37-county area, which includes the mountains of eastern Kentucky and the south central farming counties of the Kentucky Appalachian area.  Our program has a proud history of systemic advocacy on behalf of the low income community, individual client representation, and community engagement.  AppalReD staff provides legal advice and representation to clients in the full range of poverty law areas including family law, housing, public benefits, consumer law, utility issues, employment matters, and education law.  AppalReD has recently had grants to provide help to victims of domestic violence and to help prevent foreclosures.

Our program operates a network of 5 field offices with a staff of 21 attorneys, 2 paralegals, and supporting personnel.  Each area office has the necessary equipment to permit the staff to function as a first-class law firm.  All offices are accessible to nearby outdoor activities as well as within driving distance to major Kentucky cities.

Summer clerks handle a variety of tasks, including legal research, interviewing clients and witnesses, and drafting pleadings, under the direction of program attorneys. As our attorneys maintain very substantial caseloads, clerks have the opportunity to attend court regularly.

Law clerks in our offices have represented many law schools including Marquette University, Duke University, Vanderbilt University, University of Indiana, Northern Kentucky University, University of Louisville, Washington and Lee University, University of Michigan, and Case Western Reserve University.

Interested applicants should apply to Robert Johns, Executive Director, Appalachian Research and Defense Fund of Ky., Inc., 120 North Front Avenue, Prestonsburg, KY 41653; or by email at  Applicants should send a resume, a list of references, and a statement regarding the applicant’s ability to provide funding for himself/herself.  If you have questions, please contact Robert Johns at (606) 886-9876, ext. 1247 or at


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The Loyola Chapter of the National Lawyers Guild is hosting an event on February 20, 2018 from 12:30 to 2:00 PM in room 405.

NLG  will be hosting Albert Woodfox, one of the Angola 3 who spent over forty years in solitary confinement.  Mr. Woodfox is graciously giving his time to talk about the consequences of solitary and potential legal challenges going forward. Also, local New Orleans artist Maria Hinds will be show casing her photographs of another member of the Angola 3′s personal effects.  After his release, the late Herman Wallace gave Maria some of the things he held dear during his solitary confinement.  Maria took pictures of these items, which will be on display in the Smithsonian this spring.

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Come intern with the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Southeast Immigrant Freedom Initiative (SIFI)!

Get direct services experience working with detained people in Northern Louisiana this summer. We are a small office connected with a much broader initiative to bring representation to detained folks in the Southeast, where representation rates in immigration detention facilities can be as low as 6%. You will be working directly each day with people detained at La Salle detention facility in Jena, Louisiana, living on site with an energetic and supportive team, and getting a ton of hands-on experience in bond and parole advocacy.

More information about the project below:

Ideal candidates would be available for a minimum of two months in the May-August range. Spanish-speaking preferred, additional languages also welcomed (and needed!).

Please submit cover letter and resume to, as soon as possible, with “SIFI Jena Summer Intern” in the subject line.

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Columbia Law School’s Human Rights Institute is accepting applications for its Practitioner-in-Residence program. This program is designed for human rights advocates from civil society organizations, government, the United Nations, and other inter-governmental and international bodies who seek an environment in which they can engage in collaborative and cross-disciplinary research, writing, and scholarly discussion connected to their human rights practice.

While in residence at the Human Rights Institute, Practitioners-in-Residence work on their own projects. This could include scholarly, advocacy, or policy-oriented papers, human rights reports, or books for publication, or developing workshops and new research agendas, or preparing for conferences or new human rights projects. Some practitioners may wish to also conduct advocacy at the United Nations in New York, or with civil society groups, government officials, and others. Practitioners-in-Residence are invited to present their work at public lectures at Columbia Law School, and to participate actively in the human rights community at Columbia. ​

We particularly invite applications from individuals working in the global south. Each year, one or more applicants from the global south are selected to receive a “Global Advocate Award” to offset expenses associated with travel to New York and expenses during their residence. Depending on the length of the residency, the award may not cover all expenses. Once the Global Advocate is selected, the residency can be tailored to meet the needs of the advocate.

Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis. Practitioners will ideally be selected three- months in advance of their residency.

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